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Picking a dog
29 October 2011, 11:25,
#11
RE: Picking a dog
i think any large dog will have more minus's than +'s, apart from the amount of food they need, their short life span compared to smaller breeds and health problems(hip displacea for example). maybe SEVERAL dogs is what is needed post SHTF for different jobs, a terrier for ratting, a lurcher for hunting, a spaniel or labrador or poodle for retreiving , in the event of a great "die off" there will be the opportunity in the early days to acquire deceased neighbours dogs ( I mean the neighbours are deceased NOT the dogsBig Grin)
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29 October 2011, 12:51,
#12
RE: Picking a dog
I can think of 101 things to do with a dead cat, so we need to have plenty of dead cats on hand Smile

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29 October 2011, 23:24,
#13
RE: Picking a dog
hope most of my neighbours bit the dust coss i wouldn't help them
to win the war, you must be willing to die
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30 October 2011, 10:25,
#14
RE: Picking a dog
(29 October 2011, 23:24)grumpy old man Wrote: hope most of my neighbours bit the dust coss i wouldn't help them

same here, you took the words right out of my mouth!
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30 April 2012, 13:43,
#15
RE: Picking a dog
1.boerboel
2.malinois
3.blue heeler
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30 April 2012, 14:15,
#16
RE: Picking a dog
i think if i was looking for another dog i'd get a cross breed from a dogs home, something that was a good all rounder, a pet, a guard dog and a hunting dog all rolled into one, not something extra large as they cost too much to feed, and take up all the sofa! but something medium sized.
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30 April 2012, 15:06,
#17
RE: Picking a dog
Mongrels rule.
Dream dog would be a mix of:-
Timber wolf, GSD, springer, and a welsh collie.

Three portions of intellegence and two portions of strength, hopefullly in a neat package.
Go one, ask me, which is which?

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30 April 2012, 15:18,
#18
RE: Picking a dog
(30 April 2012, 15:06)Paul Wrote: Mongrels rule.
Dream dog would be a mix of:-
Timber wolf, GSD, springer, and a welsh collie.

Three portions of intellegence and two portions of strength, hopefullly in a neat package.
Go one, ask me, which is which?

nope, timber wolf too sneaky, GSD gets hip trouble, springers ok but collies can be nasty (MIL had one and it was downright vicious and UNtrainable), i prefer something like a lurcher(not a greyhound) but maybe a whippet cross.
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30 April 2012, 16:26,
#19
RE: Picking a dog
I like my patterdale, as protection dog vs. human I would say she’s not but vs. any animal she fears none.
Do not look for a sanctuary in anyone except your self    ཨོཾ་མ་ཎི་པདྨེ་ཧཱུྃ
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30 April 2012, 20:53, (This post was last modified: 30 April 2012, 21:10 by Timelord.)
#20
RE: Picking a dog
dogs dogs dogs. It is quite amazing we have so much choice today (& bred in medical issues) Thinking about a PSHTF world, then as things settle down and humans are much reduced in numbers (?possibly?), then wildlife would become abundant - as long as it is not a volcanic/nuclear winter iceage type event. Having kept around one of mans most ancient & useful tools may well prove to have been a forward thinking wise move.

As far as which dog is best, this or that, I do not know. All I can tell you, is that if we look at the history of humankind and especially surviving literary & pictoral sources, then the vast majority of dogs portrayed before the start of the specific breed type programmmes of the Middle ages, are seen to be hunting sight hounds. these range from small whippet sized to large greyhound sized in the surviving documents. Often different sizes are present at the same time. This type of dog was highly prized and usually only owned (in the historically recorded period) by chieftans/aristocracy & their immediate subordinates. This type of dog is still the majority portrayed in hunting scenes throughout the medieval period, although by now there are most of the other hunting type dogs recognisable in the pictures, from "wereterrier" to dogs for bring Bears down. In the medieval period, owbnership of sighthounds was outlawed by the common folk and any found were destroyed + incarceration for their owners. In the post medieval period, this transformed into any dogs of this type found in ownership of the commoners, was immediately to have its claws pulled out - so it could not run & turn after prey. It would seem from this info, that commoners did indeed have a soft spot for this type of dog & its hunting usefulness.

Due to this type of breed having shared mankinds campfire for possibly many of thousands of years and because they have not changed significantly over the period, then they are less prone to disease & mediacl problems. Also they seem to be well intune with their owners desires and if raised normally from a puppy, they have few behavioural problems. one thing they are more prone to is cuts & nicks on their legs when running into or through undergrowth, woodland or fences, so some basic first aid knowledge for this is recommended.
The lurcher variety of the sighthound is probably generally the truer example of the breed due to the 19th century excess of animal genetic breeding programmes which led to the specialist Greyhound & Whippet at the extremes of the breed typology. The lurcher is less prone to the possible injuries of the Whippet & Greyhound, probably due to this reason & not being so highly tuned to some varying degree.
A full size greyhound or large lurcher is a scary sight when angry to any intruder. They might not have the bulk and fighting ability to the degree of say a Rottie, but for an intruder looking at the jaws of an unfriendly greyhound, it would definitely be offputting!

Ah yes, one more thing I remember - A lurcher was regarded as a poachers dog until very recently ans as such were known to be able to be trained to do 2 handy things.
1) stay silent when detecting an intruder - just to alert the owner and be on guard.
2) to be able to be instructed to return home by a different route to the owner/poacher if the poacher had been rumbled by the gamekeeper.

Did you know that when the Roman Emporer hadrian was justifying launching a campaign to conquer Britannia in 54BC for its resources, he stated as one of his justifications, that the Celtic tribes of Britannia supplied the best hunting dogs in the known world & throughout the Roman Empire. It seems the Britons have always had a thing for dogs. lol
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