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SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
18 November 2011, 19:45,
#1
SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
© 2010 Northern Raider

Survival vests or load bearing vests or multi pocket vests are becoming increasingly popular with survivalists, they can be worn instead of carried which many people prefer for various reasons, they can either supplement or replace bug out bags though I must admit to having both. The main advantage for concerned people about having useful equipment about their person on a daily basis is that a partially loaded vest can be worn as normal daily attire in most cases. This allows people quite a bit of leeway in choosing what kit that can have readily to hand all day every day. I also have a lightweight bug out vest to supplement the BoB and BoV that is light and comfortable which I wear all the time as part of my normal dress.



SURVIVAL VEST KIT

Below is a description of my own Bug out Vest and its contents

Snowbee Multi Pocket ( 14) vest in olive drab, ( Modified, Larger Heavier Zip fitted, two out of three mesh outer pockets removed)
Storm proof butane lighters x2
Silva type 4 / 54 compass (Tritium illuminated) in Mils and Degrees
Survival whistle
LED Flashlight plus spare batteries
Mini LED torch Zipper fitting model
Thermometer
Fishing kit
Pain killers (Aspirin, Brufen, Paracetamol)
Assorted Band aids
Gloves (leather single skin)
Lock knife (Cold Steel Voyager Tanto)
Maps O/S 1:50,000(Or A4 Sectional maps)
Zip lock bags
Para cord 550 ft lb
Water puri tabs
Knife Sharpener
Coffee, sugar and whitener sachets.
Map reading aide memoir
Baby wipes

I am considering adding another set of folding secateurs to vest kit, but this would open the door to me carrying another multi tool which I already have on my belt, I also find that both Mini mag lite and LED flash lights that need 2 or 3 AA batteries take up to much space lengthwise, so I have now changed them for a pair of lens focused LED flashlights than run on CR123A batteries

All contents of pockets in Zip lock bags


LIGHTWEIGHT BUG OUT VEST

In 2003 one of the American contributors on the Misc Survivalism news group mentioned in passing he was working on a lightweight Bug out Vest that he could wear every day, without attracting unwanted attention.
I thought I would take a look at the subject from a British viewpoint. The main differences between the two systems will be the make of the vest and its type of construction (mesh backed for warm climes and poly-cotton for colder climes) and of course the inevitable firearm that the American could carry and Briton could not, The American system had a seven (???) shot revolver in .22 cal Long Rifle included in its make up.

I have been thinking about some sort of compromise between the basic pocket survival tin that most of us carry around and a full blown bug out vest weighing in at an average of 7 or more kilos.
What I am playing around with is a lightweight vest that I can wear every day without attracting unwanted attention, but has enough practicality to act as an interim survival vest.
The sort of thing I am considering is something like the new Regatta cotton / mesh travel vest (slightly modified to suit my own needs) in olive drab material, it only weighs in at about 1 ½ lb.
In this vest which is only about the third of the weight of my Snowbee Bug out vest I was thinking about the following space and weight saving options.

A Swiss card credit card tool (Scissors, fine knife, rule, pen, tweezers.)*****
A Tool logic credit card tool (Compass, magnifier, 2 inch skinning knife, tin / bottle opener) *****
A BCB steel credit card tool (Solid Steel, reflector, spanner, screwdriver, can be made into mini axe)*****
A key ring size LED flashlight
A Gerber EZ out lightweight folder (or possibly a Spyderco spydercard knife?)
A Gerber Pen sized sharpening stone
10 yards para cord
A plasticised aluminium pouch for cooking in / carrying water (type of thing MREs come in)
A card of Ibuprofen, Aspirin, and Paracetamol
A selection of band aids/ steri strips
A card of 10 water puri tabs
A sachet of Potassium Permanganate
A Sun Micro compass
A Lightweight FM radio
A Windproof butane lighter (the type with a safety catch)
A few energy bars, bits of jerky, mint cake.
A micro monocular
A wire Saw
A fishing line, hooks and lead shot
Four chemical light sticks
A laminated A 4 sectional map of the area you are visiting
All the above in Zip lock bags
A large plasticised survival bag

The total weight including the vest is still less than 5 lbs

***** These tools are in my wallet anyway, I always have a Multi tool like a Gerber Mod 600 and a quality folder Cold Steel Voyager Tanto on my belt

This leaves me the option of keeping my heavy full sized Bug out Vest in my car or at home, but still affords me some increased level of protection without me looking like a member of the SAS on a scud hunting mission.
* The contents of the lightweight BoV could also easy be kept in a hip pack.


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18 November 2011, 21:19,
#2
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
I have in the past particularly when travelling abroad used a similar vest type arrangement which has many similarities with what you describe and have been thinking of something simialr for "home " use. Ihave not yet mamanged to identify something whcih would fit the purpose of carrying, yet not look too "offensive" (in all its connotations) or attract too much attention. I haven't seen the Regatta job yet but much of their stuff appears quite useful.
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18 November 2011, 21:26,
#3
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
Hawkshead do a good lightweight vest. Small enough to be worn underneath a top and not be noticed but with loads of pockets for the essentials
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18 November 2011, 22:05,
#4
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
I've been considering looking at these as part of clothing for every day. Different loads for each use.
Skean Dhude
-------------------------------
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. - Charles Darwin
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18 November 2011, 22:10,
#5
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
(18 November 2011, 22:05)Skean Dhude Wrote: I've been considering looking at these as part of clothing for every day. Different loads for each use.

You are thinking far to much the same way I do!! Smile

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19 November 2011, 14:12,
#6
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
something very similar is available in our local market for £15, i bought one last year.
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19 November 2011, 14:35,
#7
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
(19 November 2011, 14:12)bigpaul Wrote: something very similar is available in our local market for £15, i bought one last year.

Yup I think my Regatta one cost about £15 , and they are a doddle to tailor and modd to suit your own kit carrying needs.

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19 November 2011, 18:23,
#8
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
Would wind up torches and solar powred torches be better ? Say if i pack my ruck sacks and rely on batteries ,Time i bug out they might become flat and my gear is stored in cold conditions ;-/
Watch your six
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19 November 2011, 20:13,
#9
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
(19 November 2011, 18:23)Twoesme Wrote: Would wind up torches and solar powred torches be better ? Say if i pack my ruck sacks and rely on batteries ,Time i bug out they might become flat and my gear is stored in cold conditions ;-/

Two options really, wind up radios and torches but some of em are not that good or powerful, or buy battery powered radios and torches and use stuff like Energiser Lithium batts to power them, most have a shelf life of at least 10 years. I have a mixture of both, High powered tactical flashlight for the BOBs and wind up ones for the camping gear.

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19 November 2011, 20:23,
#10
RE: SURVIVAL BUG OUT VESTS
Only real way to do it is to go around everything every year, check them and replace if required. it is a bit of a waste in many respects but kids go through a lot of batteries anyway so they do get used rather than thrown and it's not like they are very expensive. (Some anyway).
Skean Dhude
-------------------------------
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. - Charles Darwin
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