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Primary Style of Hunting?
26 July 2017, 16:05,
#21
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
Well i am enjoying Keith's posts and interested in hearing more......rock on Keith !
To take a look back in times past, its easy to see future direction you need to be.
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29 July 2017, 22:13,
#22
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
Keith, don't worry mate many of us are finding your posts interesting. Sorry to hear of your health problems but as MB said none of us were to know.
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30 July 2017, 07:35,
#23
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
(29 July 2017, 22:13)LAC Wrote: Keith, don't worry mate many of us are finding your posts interesting. Sorry to hear of your health problems but as MB said none of us were to know.

I recovered just fine, except for my short term memory. My point is people don't know everything about other people, & I frankly see no point in saying something if you don't have anything good to say.
Thank you LAC, appreciated.
Keith
Do not try to understand them, and do not try to make them understand you; for they are a breed apart and make no sense. Natty Bumpo, Last Of The Mohicans.
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30 July 2017, 07:40,
#24
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ar8Jk0hFNXQ

[youtube/]Ar8Jk0hFNXQ[youtube]
Keith.
Do not try to understand them, and do not try to make them understand you; for they are a breed apart and make no sense. Natty Bumpo, Last Of The Mohicans.
Reply
30 July 2017, 17:26,
#25
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
Cheers Keith very interesting mate
just read alas Babylon ,so im going to get more salt!!!!
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30 July 2017, 19:18,
#26
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
Not saying anything if you have nothing good to say is a sure fire recipe for the promotion of morons to positions of power from which they can not be removed at all levels of business, politics, and society.

Keeping silent when observing mistakes never came into consideration with any of my professors during my education or from any of my bosses once in the real world where mistakes cost money and sometimes lives if the fire codes are not met.

Sorry about your series of strokes but they do not alter reality.

I watched your video. Most of the recommendations apply to persons moving about on foot and the standard mode of transport during the Muzzle loading era was by boat and horse. People back then carried much more gear than a person on foot could manage using the water ways as access routes and when traveling overland they had strings of up to 200 pack horses. That was everywhere, including Australia. You guys even imported camels so you would not have to walk!

People traveling long distances on foot were so rare that they were often noted in texts as being a bit eccentric.

On one expedition into the U.S. "middle ground" a group led by the Bledsoe brothers took 2600 deer hides. That alone would require around 75 pounds of lead, 40 pounds of powder and 13 pack horses to carry out the load of hides. Members were not allowed to join the group unless they provided adequate horses and at least one good dog.

River access often involved boats of up to 20 feet carrying gear such as fire irons, kettles and barrels of provisions and had up to 50 members in the party.

Persons stumbling through the woods with only what they could carry on their backs was either a short term hunting trip or a "survival situation" indeed, and not the normal thing at all. When people on foot did survive it is often noted in the records and magnified in the oral history because most people traveling alone and on foot were going to die.
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30 July 2017, 23:51,
#27
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
Scroll down this link and see what Lewis and Clark took for 27 men for forty days

https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=LqGX...al&f=false
ATB
Harry
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31 July 2017, 00:57,
#28
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
Thanks for the link HP, a good read...

Here is another which goes into detail on the expedition's problems acquiring food:

http://tomremington.com/2012/02/22/from-...-for-food/

Finding food was not always an easy chore. As a matter of fact, the expedition was forced many times to kill and eat horses they had bought from the Indians. Through many days travel from the Continental Divide and down through the Columbia River, Lewis and Clarke bought dogs from the Indians to feed their troops. During their first winter camping alongside the Missouri River, the expedition may have starved to death had it not been for the modest supplies of dried foods the natives had that Lewis and Clark were able to trade for...

Written January 3, 1806 by Clark in the Journals of Lewis and Clark:

“Our party from necessity have been obliged to subsist some length of time on dogs, have now become extremely fond of their flesh; it is worthy of remark that while we lived principally on the flesh of this animal we were much more healthy, strong and more fleshy than we have been since we left the buffalo country. As for my own part, I have not become reconciled to the taste of this animal as yet.”

Capt Lewis, January 5, 1806, from the Journals of Lewis and Clark:

“The want of bread I consider as trivial provided I get fat meat, far as to the species of meat I am not very particular. The flesh of the dog, the horse and the wolf, having from habit become equally familiar with any other, and I have learned to think that if the chord be sufficiently strong, which binds the soul and body together, it does not so much matter about the materials which compose it.”

73 de KE4SKY
In
"Almost Heaven" West Virginia
USA
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31 July 2017, 01:24,
#29
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
(30 July 2017, 17:26)Barneyboy Wrote: Cheers Keith very interesting mate
Thank you Barney, appreciated.
Keith.
Do not try to understand them, and do not try to make them understand you; for they are a breed apart and make no sense. Natty Bumpo, Last Of The Mohicans.
Reply
31 July 2017, 01:28,
#30
RE: Primary Style of Hunting?
(30 July 2017, 19:18)Mortblanc Wrote: Not saying anything if you have nothing good to say is a sure fire recipe for the promotion of morons to positions of power from which they can not be removed at all levels of business, politics, and society.

Keeping silent when observing mistakes never came into consideration with any of my professors during my education or from any of my bosses once in the real world where mistakes cost money and sometimes lives if the fire codes are not met.

Sorry about your series of strokes but they do not alter reality.

I watched your video. Most of the recommendations apply to persons moving about on foot and the standard mode of transport during the Muzzle loading era was by boat and horse. People back then carried much more gear than a person on foot could manage using the water ways as access routes and when traveling overland they had strings of up to 200 pack horses. That was everywhere, including Australia. You guys even imported camels so you would not have to walk!

People traveling long distances on foot were so rare that they were often noted in texts as being a bit eccentric.

On one expedition into the U.S. "middle ground" a group led by the Bledsoe brothers took 2600 deer hides. That alone would require around 75 pounds of lead, 40 pounds of powder and 13 pack horses to carry out the load of hides. Members were not allowed to join the group unless they provided adequate horses and at least one good dog.

River access often involved boats of up to 20 feet carrying gear such as fire irons, kettles and barrels of provisions and had up to 50 members in the party.

Persons stumbling through the woods with only what they could carry on their backs was either a short term hunting trip or a "survival situation" indeed, and not the normal thing at all. When people on foot did survive it is often noted in the records and magnified in the oral history because most people traveling alone and on foot were going to die.

Travel on Foot.
In the Monongahela valley in western Virginia, for instance, the only way in was on foot, over Indian or animal trails, from jumping-off points at Fort Pitt, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, or Winchester, Virginia—each at a distance of roughly 100 miles. Immigrants had to cross over the mountains carrying all their possessions on pack animals or on their backs. Many of the immigrants were too poor to have more than one horse or cow, and often had no pack animals at all. The trails were too narrow and steep to accommodate a cart, or even a wheelbarrow, let alone a wagon.
Travelling south on the Monongahela from Fort Pitt by boat was prevented by the extreme shallowness of the river south of Redland—the water was just a few inches deep and would scarcely float a canoe, and not at all if it were loaded with supplies.
This meant that families arrived in the wilderness with only a bare minimum of necessities. Foremost among these would be weapons and tools: muskets, knives, traps, axe, hatchets, grubbing hoe, sickle, cooking pot, needles, perhaps a spinning wheel (usually just the wheel; the rest could be built later). Some tools, such as mauls, rakes and pitchforks, did not have to be packed in as they could be built entirely of wood from the forest. There was no source for purchasing iron on the frontier—it all had to be packed in. Often just the iron heads of hoes, hammers, axes, etc, would be packed, and the wooden handles made later.

Sources:
Arnow, Harriet Simpson. Seedtime on the Cumberland (NY: Scribner’s, 1960).
Boback, John M. Indian Warfare, Household Competency, and the Settlement of the Western Virginia Frontier, 1749 to 1794. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. (Morgantown, WV: Department of History, West Virginia University, 2007).
De Hass, Wills. History of the Early Settlement and Indian Wars of Western Virginia; Embracing an Account of the Various Expeditions in the West, Previous to 1795. (Wheeling, VA: H. Hoblitzell, 1851).
Doddridge, Joseph. Notes on the Settlement and Indian Wars of the Western Parts of Virginia and Pennsylvania from 1763 to 1783, Inclusive, Together with a Review of the State of Society and Manners of the First Settlers of the Western Country (Pittsburgh: John S. Ritenour and Wm T. Lindsey, 1912).
http://www.suite101.com/content/how-pion...er-a367254

Keith.
Do not try to understand them, and do not try to make them understand you; for they are a breed apart and make no sense. Natty Bumpo, Last Of The Mohicans.
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