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When prepping pays off
27 November 2016, 13:42,
#1
When prepping pays off
Affeected me this morning. When prepping pays off.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/le...05846.html
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2 December 2016, 23:06,
#2
RE: When prepping pays off
Been so ill recently, sometimes walking to the shops was too much. For a squaddie that is used to being strong and fit, it was horrible.
Still, those stored cans of beans and pam helped so much.
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3 December 2016, 00:27,
#3
RE: When prepping pays off
(2 December 2016, 23:06)Rocks Wrote: Been so ill recently, sometimes walking to the shops was too much. For a squaddie that is used to being strong and fit, it was horrible.
Still, those stored cans of beans and pam helped so much.

Sorry to hear that mate, hope you're recovering well.
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3 December 2016, 12:15,
#4
RE: When prepping pays off
(2 December 2016, 23:06)Rocks Wrote: Been so ill recently, sometimes walking to the shops was too much. For a squaddie that is used to being strong and fit, it was horrible.
Still, those stored cans of beans and pam helped so much.

Not much fun when you can't do what you used to do. Even the smallest thing is an event and is what we prepare for. The maximum we prepare covers us for thousands of little things.

Hope you get better.
Skean Dhude
-------------------------------
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. - Charles Darwin
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3 December 2016, 13:50,
#5
RE: When prepping pays off
Thanks guys, slowly coming back Smile
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10 December 2016, 16:17,
#6
RE: When prepping pays off
(27 November 2016, 13:42)LAC Wrote: Affeected me this morning. When prepping pays off.

http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/le...05846.html

More water problems again this morning, same thing burse water main, but not so bad this time as put right in a few hours. Same thing hit Islington a few weeks ago, and Camberwell about a month before that.

It seems it is becoming more common in London now, so any London preppers, advise to double up on your water preps if you can.

My thoughts as to the reasons are mainly twofold. Firstly, a possible lack of investment by the water companies, and secondly, more increased demand on the system due to increase in population.

Been looking out for signs of economic collapse, global conflict etc, perhaps overlooked signs of the actual physical infrastructure breaking down...

LAC
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11 December 2016, 15:38,
#7
RE: When prepping pays off
I have been a serious prepper since the 1960s and have not experienced a world wide financial collapse or seen the total breakdown of society yet.

I have seen blizzard, fire, drought, temporary grid down and personal tragedy., making the preps worth the effort.

London, like many of the older cities in the U.S. (Yes the newly developed urban technologies came to both areas at the same time) is subject to aging infrastructure. Pipes break, seals crack, the earth shifts under them and streets collapse.

and the people that live and work in those areas scream like banshees if their routine is disturbed my new utility construction, so the old systems are used beyond their normal lifespan.

Such is life.
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11 December 2016, 19:48,
#8
RE: When prepping pays off
(11 December 2016, 15:38)Mortblanc Wrote: I have been a serious prepper since the 1960s and have not experienced a world wide financial collapse or seen the total breakdown of society yet.

I have seen blizzard, fire, drought, temporary grid down and personal tragedy., making the preps worth the effort.

London, like many of the older cities in the U.S. (Yes the newly developed urban technologies came to both areas at the same time) is subject to aging infrastructure. Pipes break, seals crack, the earth shifts under them and streets collapse.

and the people that live and work in those areas scream like banshees if their routine is disturbed my new utility construction, so the old systems are used beyond their normal lifespan.

Such is life.

Understand where you're coming from MB, however it seems to have become much more common recently - another:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...-week.html

Say about 10 years ago, you may hear about 5-10 burst water mains in a year, now we're getting to that number in a month - plus big sink holes opening up. Maybe London is sinking under the weight of the influx of newcomers?

LAC
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11 December 2016, 20:50,
#9
RE: When prepping pays off
LAC, the whole system is the same age, it will reach the same end of life at the same time. Eventually great sections of clay pipe will shatter and collapse if not replaced or lined with plastic, which is what is happening right now.

All of it can be repaired but the councils look at the cost and go into shock. They would have to divert money from social programs or increase taxes to pay for the projects. They put it on the list. We all know having something on the list solves any problem

They move to another list quickly and let the problem go until the system collapses. In your situation that point has been reached. Infrastructure repairs are not a popular way to spend tax money and pull in few immediate votes.

The system has gone past the "patch it" stage.

The sink holes are due to erosion of soil caused by water escaping from the cracked and burst mains, not the weight of the people in the city.
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11 December 2016, 22:25,
#10
RE: When prepping pays off
(11 December 2016, 20:50)Mortblanc Wrote: LAC, the whole system is the same age, it will reach the same end of life at the same time. Eventually great sections of clay pipe will shatter and collapse if not replaced or lined with plastic, which is what is happening right now.

All of it can be repaired but the councils look at the cost and go into shock. They would have to divert money from social programs or increase taxes to pay for the projects. They put it on the list. We all know having something on the list solves any problem

They move to another list quickly and let the problem go until the system collapses. In your situation that point has been reached. Infrastructure repairs are not a popular way to spend tax money and pull in few immediate votes.

The system has gone past the "patch it" stage.

The sink holes are due to erosion of soil caused by water escaping from the cracked and burst mains, not the weight of the people in the city.

MB - Good explanation. I was joking about about the number of people making it sink Smile

That said though, could not the increase in the number of residents put more of a strain on the infrastructure, thereby decreasing its lifespan so that it needs to be replaced earlier?

LAC
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