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Canary islands mega tsunami
21 April 2013, 08:23,
#1
Canary islands mega tsunami
Did anybody see the recent documentary on the possibility of a mega tsunami coming from a collapse of one of the canary islands ?, the computer simulations and tests they did gave a result that indicated that the uk could get hit by a tsunami up to 25m high depending on severity. with north Africa, Portugal and east coast of usa also getting hit.
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21 April 2013, 08:46,
#2
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
Yeah, I caught that one as well. Our coastal areas, and low level farmland would be inundated apparently.
Apparently large areas of the eastern US would be cut off with no resupply, because all the ports which are connected to the trains, which shuttle goods around would be fubar.

They also said that Japan was ready, but they still couldn't cope. I can't believe that they were ready, especially after I saw the photos of people panic buying.
Woe to those who add house to house and join field to field, Until there is no more room, So that you have to live alone in the midst of the land!
Isaiah 5:8
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21 April 2013, 09:30,
#3
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
looking at a map i dont see how Japan would really be affected, it looks like theres plenty between them to slow a 25m wave. The wave affecting America does seem more plausable but is there no chance of the wave rolling itself out before it got there? obviously Spain, Portugal and North West Africa would be worst hit with being closest but it looks like spain would shield a lot of the UK with Ireland being the potentially worst hit as thats in a direct line.

But a lot of this will just depend on the severity. The way im thinking of it is like, if you drop a brick into a pond its going to cause a big splash and a fair size wave to ripple out, but if you slide the brick in the ripples are a lot smaller.

however this is all just assumption and guess work from my side point of view Smile
Winter is coming
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21 April 2013, 10:58, (This post was last modified: 21 April 2013, 10:59 by bigpaul.)
#4
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
i think the answer is dont like on the coast and you have a fair chance of surviving it! having seen the tv footage of the Indonesian one i think the coastal areas will be wiped clean of people and buildings, you need to be on high ground to have a chance of survival.

typing error#like# read live.
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21 April 2013, 11:09,
#5
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
i think one of the main problems a lot of the places that get really devistated by tsunamis have is theyre flat. theres no hills or anything to slow the water down.
Winter is coming
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21 April 2013, 11:19,
#6
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
(21 April 2013, 11:09)Hex Wrote: i think one of the main problems a lot of the places that get really devistated by tsunamis have is theyre flat. theres no hills or anything to slow the water down.

that was actually my point!!Big GrinBig Grin
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21 April 2013, 11:21,
#7
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
lol Big Grin fair enough Big Grin
Winter is coming
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21 April 2013, 14:15,
#8
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
It was also on Horizon in 2000 I think. I would flood the south and west coast and cause a bit of devastation, but UK would get of lightly compared to the USA where the eastern seaboard would see flooding 20 miles inland.
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21 April 2013, 14:37,
#9
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
At 25 meters, the wave would cause huge damage, but there are a lot of cliff around the cornwall area. Sure some places would die, but by the time it's that inland, the wave would be hugely de-energised. Port towns would be screwed but most places would be okay.
Dissent is the highest form of Patriotism - Thomas Jefferson
Those who sacrifice freedom for security deserve neither - Benjamin Franklin
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21 April 2013, 14:59,
#10
RE: Canary islands mega tsunami
The east coast of the U.S. is what we refer too as a "tidewater area". It is much like England along the Thames, where the tides make the River run backwards as it surges inland.

The U.S. is the same for about 200 miles inland all up and down the east coast.

Our entire State of Florida is not more then 10m above sea level and most is no more than 2 m above sea level. The highest point in that state is the roof of the Mariot Hotel in Miami.

The highest point on our entire east coast is the landfill on Staton Island in New York City.

One must move 150-200 miles inland before they reach points 100-200m above sea level.

Even in the interior, what we call the midwest, there is a great strech between the Applation and Rocky Mountains where the land is flat as a pancake and never more then 75m above sea level. If a tsunami came off the Azores and ran straight up the Gulf of Mexico like out famous hurrican Katrina did, it could wipe out a huge section of our midlands.

According to the global warming predictions dating from the late 1980s, about 1/3 of our nation should already be under water! No one seems to hold them accountable for failed perdfictions and simply lets them ramble along with no accountability for their grants and research funding.
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