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Storing tins in a damp environment
9 February 2014, 06:42,
#21
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
To prevent tins from rusting cover with grease. To store below ground dig down below the frost line and bury in strong plastic tubs. The temperature below the frost line is approximately 59 degrees. Kenneth Eames.
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9 February 2014, 10:12,
#22
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
bugger...grease ken! ......will have to dig up and do it again......many thanks
The ability to laugh at yourself while you learn is a great attribute.
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27 April 2017, 08:09,
#23
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
It also depends on what you store and what you use. It'd probably wise to store dry products and use glass airtight containers. Try referring to this article - https://survivallife.com/8-survival-food...tore-them/
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28 April 2017, 21:54,
#24
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
As a side note, since I have not made a post on this thread mostly due to lack of caring, why does not everyone open their preferred method of storage and inform us as to how well it worked over the past 3 years?

I can inform everyone that the cases of tins stored in my clean and dry back room are undamaged, unrusted and the labels are still intact so I do not have to open them to find out what I am about to eat. No extreme measures, plastic boxes, nets or sealed buckets were required to reach this goal, they are just stacked on shelves.
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28 April 2017, 23:06,
#25
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
In my case i have had lots of fails...mostly with tinned goods , i have stored these indoors on a shelved system ...the shelves made from 2" x 1" batten to allow air through and ventilate ...i have cut a vent to the outside and temperature has been steady..and still failed ..... i have used insulation to try and counter the damage (RUST) improvement but still not right , so i moved the lot into a back of an old lorry body ...i insulated it all walls and floor back last year , this faces north so i thought this would do better keeping the prepps cooler , again the shelve system this time was the same, i opened up this week to check ....not at all good tins had signs of condensation label damage and some leaking (fruit tins and tomato tins ) were the worst ....all dried stores in mylar bags have done the best no signs at all of damage....all these stores are in plastic barrels and sealed ranging from 10 k to 60 k so this week i have loaded some new 30 k kegs with new tin stocks to see if this method is any better....very relevant post MB....i would be very interested to know more of the circumstances of how you manage to get your success ....i must be doing something wrong....can you describe your back room ....heat ...cold...insulation...position.
The ability to laugh at yourself while you learn is a great attribute.
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29 April 2017, 02:55,
#26
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
I am currently using and rotating stock from my preps which was put away a few years prior to the Y2K rollover, so most is 20 years old. All are in #10 cans from Oregon Freeze Dry which were put up in the manufacturer's original waxed brown corrugated cardboard double-wall boxes, seams sealed with filament reinforced plastic tape and each layer of four cartons, each containing 12 #10 cans being shrink wrapped in plastic. There are four layers of 48 #10 cans or 192 cans stacked on each plastic pallet, raised 4 inches off the concrete floor, with moth balls being spread between each layer, the packing list for each layer taped on the side, then the whole business wrapped again in shrink wrap.

Food was stored in a cellar utility closet with circuit breaker panel, distribution box and control panels for house alarm system and backup generator.

On cartons I have opened to use so far, there has been NO RUST or visible deterioration at all. All food opened has been good enough to serve to guests for Sunday dinner.

73 de KE4SKY
In
"Almost Heaven" West Virginia
USA
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29 April 2017, 10:11,
#27
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
I store perishable goods in the house. Items like books, electronic devices and other things I don't want major temperature fluctuations in. I tried all sorts to store tins in my shed and they all started to rust eventually. Moisture in the air froze an then started spots when it defrosted. I found that tins coated in a paint lastd well but took too long to do and if you lost your list you got surprise for lunch. I now store mine in sealable blue tubs and but a handful of rice in the bottom to obsorb any moisture in the air. It has the added benefit of attracting asians who maintain any electronic components stored in there as well. Smile
Skean Dhude
-------------------------------
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. - Charles Darwin
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1 May 2017, 20:20,
#28
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
I can't keep my tins stacked on shelves in my house because there's 6 of us and just not enough room. We are lucky to have a double garage with good ventilation so moisture doesn't seem to be an issue and we don't have rodents. The tins are just by themselves on cheap ikea shelves around the edge of the garage walls, arranged by use-by-date. These are mostly only high-calorie tins - we avoid anything low calorie as we don't have the room for huge numbers of cans. We only have 3 month's worth of food at the moment at 2k calories per person per day, but this is slowly increasing (and we're rotating it haphazardly). I would like to top it up with a huge cache of freeze-dried food, but this would cost a bit too much at the moment. The tins don't seem to degrade at all but the oldest is only 2 years old - I'm fairly recent to prepping.
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1 May 2017, 22:22,
#29
RE: Storing tins in a damp environment
Sethorly I found my tins rusted after a few years in that environment. The shed I mention above was replaced by a garage with the same issues.
Skean Dhude
-------------------------------
It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent that survives. It is the one that is the most adaptable to change. - Charles Darwin
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