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Question of Survival
3 August 2018, 08:32,
#1
Information  Question of Survival
While camping or hunting one need to be very careful of the survival kit they are carrying as it can be the difference between life and death, i was reading this article and it was good written so i want to share it with you all, here have a look https://swordsswords.com/blog/things-to-...vival-kit/
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3 August 2018, 18:40,
#2
RE: Question of Survival
(3 August 2018, 08:32)Billy02 Wrote: While camping or hunting one need to be very careful of the survival kit they are carrying as it can be the difference between life and death, i was reading this article and it was good written so i want to share it with you all, here have a look https://swordsswords.com/blog/things-to-...vival-kit/

In my AO I would choose different items than he has chosen.

Death from hypotheria/exposure is biggest risk here.

Have rain gear and an extra insulating layer which is warm when wet, always.

Have bomb proof reliable fire starting gear. Vaseline and cotton ball tinder is good and I do carry it, along with a spark wheel starter in the mini kit, repacking an old Zippo with tinder and extra flint works well.

Instead of a condom, take a real food grade water container, which doubles as cooking pot. I carry USGI quart canteen, cup, warming stand, mess kit spoon, and my Zippo fire kit in the canteen case.

In hunting coat or ruck a Sawyer mini filter and a drinking tube.

Instead of mouthwash, I use vinegar for various personal hygiene uses,

If you prefer alcohol based or hand sanitizer can also be used for fire starting

A general-purpose folding utility knife like a SAK or Mil-K-818

Also multi-tool, Leatherman or Gerber

50 feet of sturdy utility cordage, something smaller diameter than paracord

Small single-cell AAA personal LED illuminator such as Fenix EO1 or Maratec

Using tampons to stop a major bleed is BIG no-no, only in the cinema!
instead carry a SOFT-T or CAT and Celox or QuikClot ACS.

Signal mirror, whistle, VS17 panel doubles as rain cape.

73 de KE4SKY
In
"Almost Heaven" West Virginia
USA
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4 August 2018, 17:19,
#3
RE: Question of Survival
Agree with CH.

Also please note that disguising your spam as helpful posts does not change the fact that it is spam.

Your links in every thread take us straight to your internet store.
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29 August 2018, 23:30,
#4
Thumbs Down  RE: Question of Survival
Hello

Nеwbiеѕ mаkе thе mistake оf рutting all of their hеаviеr lоаdѕ аt thе bottom оr lower ѕесtiоn оf the bаg. Dоing thiѕ will make thе bоttоm раrt naturally heavier. Hоwеvеr, ѕinсе thе bag will be ѕlung оntо уоur back, thе hеаvу weight оn the bоttоm tеndѕ tо рull on the uрреr ѕесtiоn, putting ѕignifiсаnt strain оn уоur bасk. A bеttеr аррrоасh iѕ to рut уоur heavier lоаd сlоѕеr tо уоur midѕесtiоn оr your bасk with thе outer аnd uрреr sections саrrуing the mеdium weight items аnd lightеr lоаd аt thе bоttоm. In оthеr wоrdѕ, diѕtributing thе weight of уоu load mеаnѕ putting thе bulk of thе lоаd сеntеrеd high оn your bасk, bеtwееn your ѕhоuldеr blаdеѕ. Thiѕ is the idеаl lоаd distribution fоr backpacks with integrated intеrnаl frаmеѕ.
http://www.adventure-nation.com
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30 August 2018, 00:27,
#5
RE: Question of Survival
Putting the heaviest items high in the pack puts compressive strain on the spine and is dangerously unsteady in mountainous terrain. Heavy items should be close to the center of the pack. Take a look at pack frames from the 1950′s, the meat shelf that sits up high well above the hips, they did this for a very good reason. The weight is then transferred straight down into the hips and rides substantially better. When weight falls below your hips, the pack will naturally pull back causing excessive pressure on the lower lumbar and shoulders.

To keep your pack’s weight in line with your center of gravity, ALWAYS pack rigid, dense items in the center of your pack near your back, especially with high-volume packs. Position lighter items near the top and outer layers of the pack. Empty space defeats the objective a tightly loaded, well-balanced pack. Take a soft, light item, like your woobie, and load that in the bottom of your pack. Place a hard, heavy item on top of that, and then stuff another soft item, like your bivvy, around that. Some people feel they must organize everything in stuff sacks, and then load the sacks, which turns soft objects into rigid ones and creates many unnecessary dead spaces. The items you have that are malleable the better. Use these to fill the spaces between the things that won’t play nice. Don’t be afraid to truly cram—your rack and Anasazis will be just fine, and your pack will ride better for it. If you items that just won’t fit, you need a bigger pack—or just make your buddy carry the beer.

73 de KE4SKY
In
"Almost Heaven" West Virginia
USA
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30 August 2018, 17:12,
#6
RE: Question of Survival
We all have different needs and different thoughts on how to manage them, in the UK hyperthermia is also our greatest danger due to our cold wet climate.

My BOB ideas putting it as simply as possible, without going through my pac (although i need to), a 40 litre Lowe Alpine.

Spare warm clothing and always spare wooden socks, bottom of bag. Stove, small billy and food middle of bag. Top of bag, bivi bag (always), tarp or lightweight tent.

Everything in main compartment is in a h/d plastic bag, not only to keep things dry, but if i need to cross a stream the pac would float.

Left side pocket FAK, knife, water sterilising tablets, fire making kit, paracord, medication (from scouting days, Left=Life). All in poly bags.

Right side pocket water bottle and trail snacks.

Flap pocket navigation, maps and compass, torch and spare batteries, old space blanket.

That’s all i can think of offhand.

Pac is not to heavy, stable and i can move at a reasonable pace, it should cover my needs in an emergency.
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30 August 2018, 22:13,
#7
RE: Question of Survival
(30 August 2018, 17:12)Pete Grey Wrote: We all have different needs and different thoughts on how to manage them, in the UK hyperthermia is also our greatest danger due to our cold wet climate.

My BOB ideas putting it as simply as possible, without going through my pac (although i need to), a 40 litre Lowe Alpine.

Spare warm clothing and always spare wooden socks, bottom of bag. Stove, small billy and food middle of bag. Top of bag, bivi bag (always), tarp or lightweight tent.

Everything in main compartment is in a h/d plastic bag, not only to keep things dry, but if i need to cross a stream the pac would float.

Left side pocket FAK, knife, water sterilising tablets, fire making kit, paracord, medication (from scouting days, Left=Life). All in poly bags.

Right side pocket water bottle and trail snacks.

Flap pocket navigation, maps and compass, torch and spare batteries, old space blanket.

That’s all i can think of offhand.

Pac is not to heavy, stable and i can move at a reasonable pace, it should cover my needs in an emergency.


The WOODEN socks are a bugger to put on, WOOLLEN socks are much better.
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31 August 2018, 13:58,
#8
RE: Question of Survival
I don't know about that!

I have a pair of wooden Sabots that are amazingly comfortable.

Even more comfortable with some woolen socks though so I suppose both of you are right.
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1 September 2018, 00:06,
#9
RE: Question of Survival
My BOB....Did not say but stove is an Esbit with extra fuel blocks, also i carry watch cap, gloves, a set of waterproofs, and i carry a whistle.

I’ve just recently sorted out my EDC/GHB and now i need to sort out the bob, it’s been some time since i last checked it

If things go TU and we are on foot i will carry the bob and my wife will carry the edc/ghb, with a stuff sac with extra gear (also carried in car) to upgrade it.

I also have a 25 year old Karrimor Jaguar 70 litre framed backpack but it’s a bit too heavy for me on a long trek.
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1 September 2018, 15:34,
#10
RE: Question of Survival
Gosh Pete, just because it holds 70 liters does not mean you have to put 70 liters in it!

I still think you guys are missing out by not using the "deer cart". It is made for off road, rough country use and will go anywhere you can go. And you can drag more than you can carry any old day of the week. Wake up folks, we are old!

And the cart does not cost as much as one of the fancy packs with all the zippers and pulls and saves you the decision on which color to buy.

I have been using one for years as a part of my vehicle kits and to haul the odd dead animal out of the game field. The wheels come off with the removal of a cotter pin and the rest folds flat. The big plastic packer box fits on top with a sleeping bag and extra parka to the side and it all goes nicely into the boot of my Sentra.

https://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/...t?a=351879
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